TKG008 – Kuma – ONLYEVRFWD

TKG008 – Kuma: ONLYEVRFWD

1) Ursa Major
2) Such Heights
3) EKG
4) Don’t Give Way
5) Furnace Room Dub

Available: December, 21st, 2012

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Only ever forward.

It’s a manifesto that we’ve been invoking in tangible form ever since we first started The Konspiracy Group. Be it parties, records, tunes we’ve written. The vision has always been one that remembers where we’ve been but with the desire to move in only one direction.

A fitting title then, for Kuma’s first strictly digital release for TKG Music and the first release in 2012 for the Canadian dubstep pioneer and founder of the Konspiracy Group.

ONLYEVRFWD is some eyes down business, five tracks tested on dance floors internationally and encompassing a distinct vision of dubstep for 2012. Why attempt to reference techno, footwork or deep house when you can forge your own path?

“Ursa Major” is the definitive big bear anthem, all orchestral triumph and rib cage rattling subs. Disintegrating loops late for late nights on the dance floor and a haze of skunk. Lean into it and get carries away.

“Such Heights” is a percussive roller originally designed as a 130 house tune that mutated into something completely different. All rhodes licks and dive bombing sub drop, its a siren song of a different sort entirely led by a uniquely fuzzy steppers rhythm.

“EKG” is almost the sister tune to “Ursa Major,” but where “EKG” is stirring movement, this is a darker beast entirely. Led by a reece torn straight from classic 90′s drum and bass day dreams, this is all about repetition and hypnosis through Eastern variations.

“Don’t Give Way” is what happens when John Cale meets Coil somewhere in Brixton. An uncontrollable, almost acidic bassline meets the idea of dark garage, and then the whispering begins.

“Furnace Room Dub” is a rhythm built strictly out of the 808. Inspired by hearing stories of Oris Jay writing tunes using just the hats, kicks , bass drums and toms of he legendary rhythm machine, what started off as a lesson in minimalism gets pretty heavy, pretty fast. There’s a darker shade of soul here and with good reason.